Tuesday

Thing 2: What is Web 2.0?

Library 2.0 is a term used to describe a new set of concepts for developing and delivering library services. The name, as you may guess, is an extension of Web 2.0 and shares many of its same philosophies and concepts including harnessing the user in both design and implementation of services, embracing constant change as a development cycle over the traditional notion of upgrades, and reworking library services to meet the users in their space, as opposed to ours (libraries.) Web 2.0 tools make it easy to create content and then share it via the Internet. Libraries can use the tools to promote programs and services, create useful content, and then communicate it to their users.

Many have argued that the notion of Library 2.0 is more than just a term used to describe concepts that revolve around the use of technology; it is also a term that can be used to describe both physical and mindset changes that are occurring within libraries to make our spaces and services more user-centric and inviting. Others within the profession have asserted that libraries have always been 2.0: collaborative, customer friendly, and welcoming. But no matter which side of the debate you fall on, just about everyone agrees that libraries of tomorrow, even five or ten years from now, will look substantially different from libraries today. 23 Things @ NEFLIN can help you get ready to participate in the changes!

1. Watch this short video of Stephen Abram kicks off 23 Things at Murdoch University Library in Australia.


2. Read this blog post by John Blyberg, a library blogger from Connecticut.

3. A good article on Library 2.0 is in Library Technology Reports, Volume 43 Issue 5. Read this article "The Ongoing Web Revolution". (The entire issue can be found via the Florida Electronic Library; click on Vol. 43, Issue 5 and go to the article.)

Resources
These articles offer more views on Web 2.0 and libraries:
Blog Prompts
Here are some ideas to blog about--but don't let these questions limit you. Share all your thoughts, ideas, and discoveries.
  • We know time is always an issue--Stephen Abram shares some ideas on where to find the time for 23 Things. Where will you find the time?
  • Why are you participating in 23 Things @ NEFLIN? What do you hope to learn?
  • How has the Internet and the vast resource it can be affected your use of time at work and/or at home?
  • Where are you in your knowledge and use of Web 2.0 tools? How about your library?
  • What are you looking forward to in 23 Things @ NEFLIN?

We hope you will enjoy this program. Have fun exploring and thinking about 2.0.

7 comments:

braschone said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
braschone said...

Library 2.0 looks like a natural progresson to me. The only constant is our world is change. Being prepared to evolve is a part of survival.
( I removed my previous post due to a typo!, oh I love these tools)

franque said...

It's often said "Jobs never love you back". Here in our Libraries, as Michael Stephens points out, we do extend the'Human'exchange of feelings, contact and belonging to our Patrons. It's in this sense Libraries will never lose a "monopoly [of] power" as discussed by Richard Anderson.
I see 2.0 as an Island I'm currently stranded on-an Island surrounded by a 'sea' of info made from 2.0 possibilities. Gotta learn more about it to stay on top of the 'sea.'
It's the only way to remain an effective communicator for our patrons and to remain in touch with the very real 'virtual' world.

kh23keys said...

I have to admit - that while I revel in conquering so-called new horizons, I absolutely resent that there is not much choice involved in the process. You either do or die - so to speak.

Anonymous said...

Gotta learn more about this 2.0 to stay above the water

Anonymous said...

I've always loved science fiction --it is exciting to look at what the future might be. Web 2.0 is what I read abut all those years ago as a teenager. I have to be able to participate in this futuristic world that is here now. I want to be able to be relevant to my students and my grandchildren. I don't want to be left behind.

Sonya said...

I've always loved science fiction --it is exciting to look at what the future might be. Web 2.0 is what I read abut all those years ago as a teenager. I have to be able to participate in this futuristic world that is here now. I want to be able to be relevant to my students and my grandchildren. I don't want to be left behind.